Sumatran Tiger

Panthera tigris sumatrae

Sali 2021 David Rowe Photograpy 4

Distribution:

Sumatra

Habitat:

Rainforests, Mangroves.

Diet:

Wild boar, tapir, deer, monkeys, birds, and fish.

Gestation:

103 days, two - three cubs born

Longevity:

10 - 15 years in the wild, 15 - 20 years in captivity.

Predators:

Humans

Conservation Status:

Critically Endangered

General:

The Sumatran tiger is one of the smallest tigers. The frequency of stripes is higher than in other subspecies. Males Sumatran tigers also have a prominent ruff. Tigers are strong swimmers and often bathe in ponds, lakes, and rivers, thus keeping cool in the heat of the day.

They roar to signal their presence to other individuals over long distances and can be heard 3km away. When tense, tigers will moan. For aggressive encounters, tigers growl, snarl, and hiss. Chuffing is heard in more friendly situations. Other vocalizations include grunts, woofs, and miaows.

Tigers are solitary animals and interact with each other only when special conditions permit, such as plentiful supplies of food. The basic social unit of the tiger is composed of a female and her offspring. Adult tigers are territorial and maintain home ranges, but also maintain contact with other tigers, especially those of the opposite sex.

Fun fact: Just like the human fingerprint, tiger stripes are unique to each individual tiger!

At Hamilton Zoo:

You can find our Sumatran Tigers just off the oasis lawn, past the donkeys.
There are two enclosures to view and our three sets of tigers take turns out on display.

- Sali, our very pretty sixteen year old lady, mum to Kirana
- Scout, our impressively big and handsome eight year old male, dad to Mayang & Andalas.
- Kirana, Mayang & Andalas. Kirana is a nine year old first time mum, who shares her space with her cubs born January 2024.

Keep an ear out for tiger feeds or enrichment being announced.